Herbert Hoover and the 1930 Drought, continued

Part 2 -- The Great Humanitarian Stumbles [For Part 1, see https://hoover.blogs.archives.gov/2020/09/16/herbert-hoover-and-the-1930-drought/ ] At first, Hoover’s drought relief plan was widely praised;  it seemed that he had come up with a perfect combination of Federal leadership and local control.  The state and local committees went to work with enthusiasm.  But as summer turned to fall … Continue reading Herbert Hoover and the 1930 Drought, continued

Herbert Hoover and the 1930 Drought

Part 1 -- The Forgotten Crisis For many Americans, 1930 was a year of struggle as the national economy sank into what became the Great Depression. In the history books, the stock market and urban unemployment often take center stage, leaving aside the hardships of rural America.  Already reeling from a decade of depressed prices … Continue reading Herbert Hoover and the 1930 Drought

Lou Henry Hoover’s White House History

In 1930, First Lady Lou Henry Hoover asked one of her secretaries, Dare Stark McMullin, to compile some information about the historic furnishings in the White House.  What began as a simple list grew into a massive project to document the history of the White House itself and the art and furnishings of each Administration.   … Continue reading Lou Henry Hoover’s White House History

Hoover Campaign Songs, 1928

In 1928, campaign songs were not like the borrowed pop tunes or professional advertising jingles of today.  In fact, campaign advertising in all its forms was very different than today.  There was little centralized control, no focus group tested messaging, and certainly no requirement for candidates to “approve” anything.  Most campaign songs were not commissioned … Continue reading Hoover Campaign Songs, 1928

Kicking off a Presidential Campaign — Herbert Hoover’s 1928 Acceptance Speech

On August 11, 1928, Herbert Hoover formally launched his campaign for the Presidency.  That’s not a typo -- yes, the campaign kicked off less than three months before Election Day.  At that time, Presidential candidates were expected to modestly pretend they weren’t running until after the party conventions, though of course their “friends” were working … Continue reading Kicking off a Presidential Campaign — Herbert Hoover’s 1928 Acceptance Speech

The Economy Act of 1932

By Spencer Howard On June 30, 1932, President Herbert Hoover signed into law the "Economy Act of 1932" to reduce government salaries, which was intended to help balance the Federal budget that was badly in the red due to the Great Depression.  At the time almost all economists and politicians believed that a balanced budget … Continue reading The Economy Act of 1932

Graduations that Never Happened — Herbert Hoover

During his lifetime, Herbert Hoover earned a Bachelors degree in geology from Stanford University and was awarded more than 80 honorary degrees from Universities around the world for his many humanitarian efforts.  One distinction he never earned, however, was a high school diploma. As a child, Hoover attended the local school in his hometown of … Continue reading Graduations that Never Happened — Herbert Hoover

The Good Will Tour – a Journalist’s Adventure

Rodney Dutcher was one of 27 journalists who accompanied President-Elect Herbert Hoover on his "Good Will Tour" of Latin America in November and December 1928.  Dutcher was a bureau manager and political columnist for the Newspaper Enterprise Association, one of the big news syndicates that served 850 U.S. newspapers.  As published for a much smaller … Continue reading The Good Will Tour – a Journalist’s Adventure

“Viva Hoover” exhibit – but what’s that thing that looks like a clock?

A number of visitors to the temporary exhibit "Viva Hoover!  The 1928 Goodwill Tour"have asked about one of the large photographs of the battleship USS Maryland -- what is that clock-like thing on the mast? It's a device called a "range clock," and you will see it in pictures of battleships from World War I … Continue reading “Viva Hoover” exhibit – but what’s that thing that looks like a clock?