Chance and Circumstance: Pearl Harbor in History

History is strange.  It has a perverse way of folding back on itself like a Mobius strip.  I once listened to an entire lecture by a seasoned historian who, after years of research and thought, ascribed the cause of the 1967 Detroit riots to chance and circumstance.  Really?  Can we resolve complex events to such … Continue reading Chance and Circumstance: Pearl Harbor in History

When New Communications Media Reach Maturity

While drawing analogies too closely from history is perilous, I am sometimes struck by parallels between events of today and events of the past.  Our world today is not  the only world facing disruptive technologies which test the minds of men and the flexibility of institutions.  Men and institutions today are wrestling with challenges presented … Continue reading When New Communications Media Reach Maturity

Who was Elijah Parrish Lovejoy? Why Should Hoover Invoke Him? Why Should We Care?

On November 7th, 1937, Hoover addressed students and faculty at Colby College, invoking Elijah Parrish Lovejoy, American martyr who died defending freedom of the press.  Hoover’s audience knew the Lovejoy story well.  I did not.  Lovejoy was a Colby College graduate and class poet who moved to St. Louis in 1827.  He became an abolitionist … Continue reading Who was Elijah Parrish Lovejoy? Why Should Hoover Invoke Him? Why Should We Care?

Herbert Hoover: Elder Statesman on the Move, November 1954

Traveling to Germany at President Eisenhower’s behest, Hoover gave three speeches in three days to German audiences.  Hoover was eighty years old at the time, yet he did not hesitate.  When his President called, Hoover answered.  He wrote three major policy speeches, edited them en route to Germany, and delivered them to three distinct audiences. … Continue reading Herbert Hoover: Elder Statesman on the Move, November 1954

College Football, and Mythicism, 1890s, 1950, 2020

In presenting Bud Wilkinson the 1949 Football Coach of the Year award in January 1950, Hoover said: ‘Sports have become an integral part of our American civilization. And we may be grateful that so far the advance in social concepts has left them out of governmental regimentation. Sports are still a free enterprise, and because … Continue reading College Football, and Mythicism, 1890s, 1950, 2020

Lou Hoover Adding Bricks to the Foundation of League of Women Voters

by Matthew Schaefer While Lou Henry Hoover did not campaign for suffrage, she did actively support the League of Women Voters once women gained suffrage.  She spoke at Bryn Mawr College, one of the ‘Seven Sisters’ women’s colleges, in April 1920, shortly before suffrage passed. Lou was invited by the League of Women Voter's  president, … Continue reading Lou Hoover Adding Bricks to the Foundation of League of Women Voters

Hoover Fishing Stories—As Told by Calvin Albury

In an April 1967 oral history with Ray Henle, Florida fishing guide, Calvin Albury, recalled his time fishing with Herbert Hoover.  Albury first met Hoover in December 1948 at the Key Largo Anglers Club.  Hoover needed a new guide for fishing off the Florida Keys.  He said to Albury: ‘It looks like I’m going to … Continue reading Hoover Fishing Stories—As Told by Calvin Albury

Lou Hoover and the Bandeirantes of Brazil

Extroverted by nature, Lou Hoover likely enjoyed the Latin American trip more than her husband Herbert.  As the tour entered it final port of call in South America, Rio de Janeiro, Lou made time to visit with the Federacao des Bandeirantes, a Brazilian Girl Scout troop.  Given Hoover’s deep and long involvement with the Girl … Continue reading Lou Hoover and the Bandeirantes of Brazil

President Hoover and the Fourth of July

Earlier this month a researcher asked: ‘What did President Hoover do on the Fourth of July?’ This question had never been put to me, so my answer was: ‘I don’t know; I’ll get back to you.’  A quick review of Hoover’s calendar and his Public Papers was revealing. July 4th, 1929 fell on a Thursday, … Continue reading President Hoover and the Fourth of July