Revisiting Hoover’s Memo to Truman, May 1945

At this time last year, I wrote a blog on Hoover’s return to the world stage in response to President Truman’s request for Hoover’s insights into the food situation in Europe immediately after V-E Day.  I summarized an 18-page memo Hoover sent to Truman on May 31, 1945, recapping the main points of their 55-minute … Continue reading Revisiting Hoover’s Memo to Truman, May 1945

The Phantom President

By Thomas F. Schwartz A recent viral video shows a famous Hollywood actor performing magic tricks.  Surprisingly, it is not the actor at all but someone with an uncanny resemblance.  “Deep fakes,” the use of artificial intelligence to create videos showing images so real, such as Queen Elizabeth performing a TicTok dance, that the fake … Continue reading The Phantom President

A Troubled Relationship

Herbert Hoover with President Elect Franklin D Roosevelt as they leave the White House on their way to the Inauguration ceremonies. By Thomas F. Schwartz             Much ink has been spilled on the relationship between Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.  What began as friendly mutual cooperation ended in a bitter transition of power.  It … Continue reading A Troubled Relationship

The Interstate Highway System, Dwight Eisenhower and Lou Henry Hoover

Eisenhower Interstate Sign Attentive drivers will notice that the highways connecting America are named the Dwight Eisenhower Interstate Highway System. This is a nod to Eisenhower’s commitment to securing passage of the 1956 Interstate Highway Act, a concrete legacy of his presidency.  When discussing improvements to infrastructure today, some policy wonks invoke Ike, calling for … Continue reading The Interstate Highway System, Dwight Eisenhower and Lou Henry Hoover

The 20th Amendment :  the obscure amendment that changed Inauguration Day

Today we know Inauguration Day falls every four years on January 20, but for much of American history it was March 4, almost four months after election day.  Herbert Hoover was the last and perhaps most unfortunate President to serve four months as a “lame duck.”  What changed?  The ratification of the 20th Amendment to … Continue reading The 20th Amendment :  the obscure amendment that changed Inauguration Day

Hoover and the 1932 Olympic Games

By Thomas F. Schwartz The Olympic games originated in ancient Greece as a religious and athletic festival, providing a forum of friendly competition among otherwise factious city-states. Revived in the late 1800s, the tradition of holding games every four years was well established by the 1920s.  The United States hosted the 1932 winter games in … Continue reading Hoover and the 1932 Olympic Games

Herbert Hoover: Elder Statesman on the Move, November 1954

Traveling to Germany at President Eisenhower’s behest, Hoover gave three speeches in three days to German audiences.  Hoover was eighty years old at the time, yet he did not hesitate.  When his President called, Hoover answered.  He wrote three major policy speeches, edited them en route to Germany, and delivered them to three distinct audiences. … Continue reading Herbert Hoover: Elder Statesman on the Move, November 1954

John W. Hill on Herbert Hoover and John F. Kennedy

By Thomas F. Schwartz In his memoir, The Making of a Public Relations Man, John W. Hill, founder of the public relations firm Hill and Knowlton, Inc., devoted a chapter, “Hoover and Kennedy—A Study in Contrasts.”  Hill was a friend of Herbert Hoover so much of his assessment was not based upon hearsay from others … Continue reading John W. Hill on Herbert Hoover and John F. Kennedy

Campaign Graphic Novels

High Jacked, Doctored Photographs, and Authentic Speeches from the 1928 Campaign By Thomas F. Schwartz Few people will recognize the name Edward Anthony today.  A writer for major newspapers and popular magazines, his career spanned four decades and included a stint working for Herbert Hoover’s 1928 presidential campaign.  In an entertaining published recollection, This Is … Continue reading Campaign Graphic Novels

President Hoover and the Fourth of July

Earlier this month a researcher asked: ‘What did President Hoover do on the Fourth of July?’ This question had never been put to me, so my answer was: ‘I don’t know; I’ll get back to you.’  A quick review of Hoover’s calendar and his Public Papers was revealing. July 4th, 1929 fell on a Thursday, … Continue reading President Hoover and the Fourth of July