Do you know your Hoovers?  An historical field guide

Here at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library-Museum, we often receive questions about other famous people named Hoover, and which Hoover did what.  There are a surprising number of Hoovers and Hoover families in the United States, many of whom are entirely unrelated to each other.  It is not unusual for different Hoovers to be confused … Continue reading Do you know your Hoovers?  An historical field guide

Herbert Hoover’s vision for healthy children – Part 2: The Children’s Charter

When Herbert Hoover became President in 1929, one of his early initiatives was to call for a national conference on child health.  Hoping to build on the work of the non-profit American Child Health Association, an organization he had founded in 1923, President Hoover announced that the purpose of his proposed conference was “to study … Continue reading Herbert Hoover’s vision for healthy children – Part 2: The Children’s Charter

Herbert Hoover’s vision for healthy children – Part 1: The Child’s Bill of Rights

This image is from the Commerce Years gallery at the Hoover Presidential Museum. Of the many charitable organizations that Herbert Hoover led, one of the most important was the American Child Health Association.  In its almost 13 years of existence, from its founding by Herbert Hoover in 1923 to its liquidation in 1935, the ACHA … Continue reading Herbert Hoover’s vision for healthy children – Part 1: The Child’s Bill of Rights

Theodore and Herbert Hoover’s Childhood Recollections: A Comparative Study

By Thomas F. Schwartz The first volume of Herbert Hoover’s Memoirs appeared in 1951.  Only ten pages comprise his time in Iowa.  Theodore Hoover, Herbert’s older brother, wrote a 1939 autobiography, Memoranda: Being a Statement by an Engineer, that was never published.  It exists in typescript at the Hoover Institution with a copy at the … Continue reading Theodore and Herbert Hoover’s Childhood Recollections: A Comparative Study

Make Sure Your Getaway Vehicle Doesn’t Break Down

The following story is filed with Bureau of Standards reports to Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover: On Sunday morning, March 20, 1921, the arrest of a young man and the recovery of a truck full of Government radio equipment was reported to the Superintendent of the Bureau of Standards.  The robbery was committed by Oscar … Continue reading Make Sure Your Getaway Vehicle Doesn’t Break Down

When Typewriter Rentals Were Banned

This Royal typewriter is on display at the Hoover Museum, it is typical of what Herbert Hoover would have used while living in the Waldorf-Astoria. By Thomas F. Schwartz As the manuscript collections clearly document, Herbert Hoover was a compulsive writer.   Typically, drafts were typed, edited, amended, and retyped ad nauseam before Hoover was … Continue reading When Typewriter Rentals Were Banned

Herbert Hoover, American Relief Administration, Brussels, Belgian ca. 1919

Herbert Hoover, American Relief Administration, Brussels, Belgian ca. 1919

By Thomas F. Schwartz Herbert Hoover, American Relief Administration, Brussels, Belgian ca. 1919 Among the innovative methods to publicize the work of the Commission for Relief in Belgium [CRB] and the American Relief Administration [ARA] were two documentary film efforts, both which are lost to history.  George Barr Baker served with Herbert Hoover in both … Continue reading Herbert Hoover, American Relief Administration, Brussels, Belgian ca. 1919

Hoover’s Influence in Japan

By Thomas F. Schwartz When historians mention Herbert Hoover’s influence abroad, most cite his humanitarian efforts with food and emergency relief.  Less studied is the influence of his writings such as American Individualism which was translated into many languages and his work as Secretary of Commerce and President.  The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum … Continue reading Hoover’s Influence in Japan

Herbert Hoover and American Presidents of the 20th century, Part 3

  This third installment in the saga of Hoover’s ties with American Presidents gets tricky.  Hoover’s connections to Teddy Roosevelt and William Taft were small, self-contained universes which allowed for easy translation into a blog post.  This is not the case with Hoover and Woodrow Wilson.  Their contacts were frequent, their engagement deep, their conjoined … Continue reading Herbert Hoover and American Presidents of the 20th century, Part 3

Who’s Buried in Grant’s Tomb?

Groucho and Other Solicitations Made to an Ex-President. By Thomas F. Schwartz It was not uncommon in the Nineteenth Century for sitting and former presidents to publically endorse commercial products and services, usually without compensation.  In 1862, Abraham Lincoln wrote a glowing endorsement for his foot doctor: “Dr. Zacharie, has, with great dexterity, taken some … Continue reading Who’s Buried in Grant’s Tomb?