Mrs. Hoover and Washington Housing Shortages: Part 2

One of the U. S. Food Administration "Girls Club" lunchrooms established by Lou Henry Hoover, ca. 1918. Herbert Hoover issued a circular for the employees of the US Food Administration stating: “For some time I have felt that the Food Administration should make a special effort insuring satisfactory living quarters for our women workers.  Mrs. … Continue reading Mrs. Hoover and Washington Housing Shortages: Part 2

Mrs. Hoover and Washington Housing Shortages: Part I

Some of the women who worked for the U. S. Food Administration, 1917. These women are in the Food Conservation Division. Washington, D.C. witnessed notorious shortages of affordable housing for the many single women who filled government positions during World War I and World War II.  Several Hollywood films alluded to it, the most famous … Continue reading Mrs. Hoover and Washington Housing Shortages: Part I

War Conditions in Belgium and England

by Matthew Schaefer In the course of writing serial posts on Herbert Hoover’s activities during World War I, it occurred to this Hoover archivist that he was giving short shrift to other actors with agency in the drama.  To correct this oversight, today’s blog will respond to Abigail Adams’ challenge to not forget the ladies. … Continue reading War Conditions in Belgium and England

And the War Came:  Lou Hoover and the Great War

By Thomas F. Schwartz Lou Hoover was a prodigious letter writer.  Her correspondence provides great insight into both the life of her husband as well as her own activities.  Lou presents a graphic description of their efforts to assist stranded Americans in London at the beginning of World War I in a letter written to … Continue reading And the War Came:  Lou Hoover and the Great War

Lou Hoover and the Early Days of World War I

London, 1914, American Women's Committee. Lou Hoover is sitting at the table, the fourth one from the right. Last month we made a presentation to our local Questers group. They are big fans of Lou Hoover, so they asked us to speak on Lou and relief work during World War I.  I felt that we’d … Continue reading Lou Hoover and the Early Days of World War I

Christmas in Vienna, 1920 – Part 3: Caring for the children

Continuing Coningsby Dawson's tour of post-World War I Vienna, his writings sought to convey the absolute desperation of the people – primarily children – who were dependent on the American Relief Administration.  In this dispatch, he describes his visit to one of the child-feeding stations: Today I visited one of the strategic points where the battle … Continue reading Christmas in Vienna, 1920 – Part 3: Caring for the children

Christmas in Vienna, 1920 – Part 2: The Dorotheum

In December 1920, as Coningsby Dawson toured Central Europe writing articles to promote the American Relief Administration fund drive, he sought to inform his readers about not only the immediate work of the ARA, but also to offer a wider view of the newly independent nations that were struggling to recover from the war.  In this … Continue reading Christmas in Vienna, 1920 – Part 2: The Dorotheum

Christmas in Vienna, 1920 — Part 1: A visit from Santa

The year 2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended World War I.  As far as most Americans were concerned, that was the end of the war – the fighting stopped, the doughboys soon came home, and the Versailles Peace Conference concluded an acceptable peace. In much of Europe, the Armistice brought no … Continue reading Christmas in Vienna, 1920 — Part 1: A visit from Santa

The Invisible Guest

By Thomas F. Schwartz During the season of goblins, ghosts, witches, vampires, and zombies, “invisible guests” would find themselves among friends.  But invisibility can be the spiteful kind as in H. G. Welles, Invisible Man or something that is not present but felt.  It is the latter that Herbert Hoover evoked in a series of … Continue reading The Invisible Guest